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Eclecticist: Anti-Americanism

Show Notes & Research

Introduction

Topic Overview

Off Topic

Talking Points

Jargon

Wrap Up

From the Show

Broadcast: 19th July, 2015

Last update: 20th July, 2015

Introduction

Topic Overview

Be as nasty as you want about America and Americans without fear or apology. I reckon America is unique in this way. I can't help but imagine that if one were to speak harshly of North Korea, for example, there would inevitably be a certain clade of people (here in the west) that would take exception, and anyway, North Korea is the way it is because of American imperialism. America and Americans are 'fair game'. Simple as that.

This is first person, there are two of us. How about:

'Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free' said the Statue of Liberty to the world, at least in the words of Emma Lazarus, a 19th century American poet. Let’s also not forget those ‘inalienable rights’ from the Declaration of Independence ‘Life, Liberty and pursuit of happiness’. The United States of America has, since its inception, been a refuge for the world's ravaged, a land of opportunity for those oppressed in war-torn and heavily statist regimes. Today, it has a larger influence than any other nation in the categories of food, science, culture, weaponry and democracy. So why all the hate? Why does the American in a pub feel the need to defend his own country from derision while his Belgian and Korean friends remain unaccosted?

Off Topic

(What we’re not talking about.)

Talking Points

You know? I think it’s borne out of the elitist English taking exception to the young upstart: America when America was fighting for a place on the world stage possibly not long before the first world war. Just a feeling.

Jargon

Wrap Up

From the Show

Notes, corrections and further references

Pronounciation of Scarlett Johansson’s name.

It is not enough to succeed. Others must fail.

Gore Vidal. Quoted by Gerard Irvine, "Antipanegyric for Tom Driberg," [memorial service for Driberg] (8 December 1976)

First recorded mention of ‘double down’:

1987, Lance Humble, Carl Cooper, The World Greatest Blackjack Book[3], Doubleday, ISBN 9780385153829, page 33:

The basic double-down play means that you may make a second wager no higher than the amount of your original bet and receive one and only one additional card.

Lance could be Canadian. Definitely a North American though.