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ECLECTICIST: Podcasting

Show Notes & Research

Introduction

Topic Overview

Off-topic

Talking Points

Jargon

Wrap Up

From the Show

Broadcast: 2nd August, 2015

Last update: 2nd August, 2015

Introduction

Topic Overview

Podcasting as a broadcast medium has now firmly established itself as an advertising channel amenable by all product categories. No greater validation exists for the confirmation of a new method to draw a crowd of potential consumers than to have paying sponsors vying for the most compelling players in the market. Podcasts, syndication mechanisms, listening hardware and the pervasive behemoth that is the internet is the ecosystem in which personal broadcasting has taken off and is threatening traditional sources by outreaching them in terms of convenience, niche and hardware support. Are we headed to a better informed, more meritocratic future where everyone wields a microphone with intent?

Off-topic

What we’re not talking about

Talking Points

Each bullet is a talking point. Sub-bullets are topics that may or may not be covered. Usage: Read the bullet and sub-bullets then talk about some or all sub-bullets.

Jargon

Terminology specific to the topic

Wrap Up

From the Show

Notes, corrections and further references

Great article by Stan Alcorn: But First, A Word From 100 Podcasts’ Sponsors

(Excerpt)

  1. The typical podcast advertiser is the 2015 version of a mid-tier dot-com. Out of 186 ads, 162 — roughly 87 percent — were for products or services that acquire customers online: Web-based services for businesses (e.g. ZipRecruiter.com), Web-based services for consumers (e.g. Squarespace) and Web-ordered physical products (e.g. Dollar Shave Club).
  2. The typical podcast advertisement is the ur-example of the low-budget “native ad.” It is a podcast host or podcast producer speaking into a microphone. There was only one ad-agency-produced radio spot with voiceover and music in 186 ads.
  3. The typical podcast ad doesn’t just tell you about the product, it also tells you how to become a customer and gives you a coupon code that’s both an incentive to shop and a way to track the ad’s effectiveness. You’ve heard this type of ad. It’s the one that says: “Go to AdvertiserWebsite.com/ThisPodcast’sName for a non-neglibile percentage off your next purchase.” These are called direct response ads, and Midroll, a company that sells ads for hundreds of podcasts, says the percentage of this type of ad has actually increased in recent years — from roughly 60 percent to roughly 80 percent — though they expect that percentage to decrease in the coming years. Fully 89 percent of ads on Midroll-represented shows in the February snapshot featured a direct response coupon code.

From the BBC: Podcast 'patent troll' faces blow after US ruling

(Excerpt)

A company that claimed fees from podcasters who publish audio and video on their own websites has suffered a patent-ruling defeat.

The decision could potentially prevent Personal Audio LLC legally requiring media groups to pay it if they update their sites to show new episodes.

The Texas-based company had previously targeted US firms including CBS, NBC and Fox.

But its efforts were challenged by a digital rights campaign group.